Tentative Top 16 results from ERMC2016.

Hi there,

We saw a glitch occur on the ERMC website. We are publishing a table of the top 16 as we see them, with no claims on accuracy, quality, or perfection.

1
Mikhail LUGOVKIN
137,550
2
Désirée HEEMSKERK
126,350
3
Mateusz WOŹNIAK
118,850
4
Henrik LETH
98,350
5
Freddy CHRISTIANSEN
90,700
6
Marek WAKULUK
80,450
7
Sebastian LAVALLEE
77,300
8
Daina CHIBA
74,550
9
Alexander SCHULER
62,800
10
Luc HUMBERT
36,400
11
Alexandr ALTYNCHURIN
30,750
12
Lukas PUSCHMANN
29,000
13
John KUIJPERS
17,800
14
Yixuan Liu
3,300
15
Philipp MARTIN
-3,650
16
Sergey IGNATOV
-5,700

IORMC Qualifiers (USA / Canada)

The North American Riichi Mahjong Association is looking for players to field teams for the 2016 Interational Online Riichi Mahjong Competition. The nations of the United States and Canada are each looking to assemble teams for the November competition. The competition is hosted via Tenhou.net. So familiarity with Tenhou’s interface is encouraged.

Registration Form:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdXYylihLCNAHDOm8_UEqQwZ33Qw-Oeii3jqi62YSF1R46oGw/viewform?c=0&w=1

To qualify, players must play in at least two out of the four scheduled competitions. Any players may enter in more than two of the schedule. Only the top two qualification scores are considered. So, there is no harm for any player to enter in more than two. US players compete in one set of qualifications, while Canadian players compete in their own set of qualifications. Both the US and Canadian competitions will occur concurrently.

A total of four players per nation will be selected with two alternates. Good luck to all participants.

The competition schedule is as follows:
* September 17
* October 1
* October 15
* October 29

The times for each tryout competition is still pending.

The 2016 Interational Online Riichi Mahjong Competition is the sixth international team competition hosted by the Korean Mahjong League (KML). With each iteration, the competition has been growing year after year. The previous year hosted 6 national teams. This year, at least, thirteen teams are slated to participate. For more information on the IORMC itself, see here:
http://kml.or.kr/xe/67895?ckattempt=1

The IORMC is scheduled for November 5 @ 11 AM UTC, which is 4 AM Pacific time or 7 AM Eastern time.

To anyone unfamiliar with the Tenhou interface, instructions may be found here:
http://osamuko.com/complete-beginners-guide-to-online-mahjong-part-1-how-to-play/complete-beginners-guide-to-online-mahjong-part-1-5-playing-on-tenhou/

On behalf of NARMA, we express our thanks to the Korean Mahjong League for hosting the IORMC.

Upcoming tournaments

Rochester is right around the corner, we’ll have our usual reporting team present this March 12-13. If you’re there, ask for the Osamuko team :)

After that, there will be a tournament run once again in the beautiful city of Montreal, QC (CAN). A classic 2-day weekend tournament this June 4-5, 2016. Come enjouy the city while the exchange rate is favorable for tourists.

More info at http://riichi.ca/site/?p=113 — Be there!

Results of the 1st North American Riichi Open, in Montreal [CA]

Hello there!

Running a tournament for the first time is really a special experience. While I have been busy with stuff, I did want to get the first article out as soon as possible.

MONTREAL (QC), CANADA — 12 competitors took part in the first open* mahjong tournament using riichi rules. Dominating Day 1 was a member of Montreal’s new wave of talent, Claudel B., with all first places. On Day 2, he managed to maintain his advance by retaining his points as well as he could. Congratulations to Claudel, the Canadian Champion, who has won a Junk Mat as a prize with his +112.3 points over 8 matches. Filling the podium are Sean H. from Waterloo (ON) in 2nd place with +71.1 points, along with a tie for third place between Marc-André D. from Montreal and Luke M. from Rochester (NY), USA with +63.2 points each.

The tournament welcomed 3 players from the United States, as well as one from outside the province of Quebec, proving that Montreal is definitely going to continue growing as one of the continent’s poles of attraction for future growth at the club and in tournaments aiming to welcome players from Canada, the Unites States, as well as eventually Europe and abroad. The rules used were a suitable hybrid between local Montreal rules and practices (e.g.: inclusion of daisharin), and the rules used at the 2014 WRC in Puteaux, France (atama-hane, 15-5 uma, tenpai-renchan, no kazoe yakuman, no aborts, no weird stuff [so no ryanhan shibari or paarenchan]), while fixing the rules regarding tile exposures from any wall and the call priority (3.0 seconds BUT only 0.5 seconds to override).

The organizer (and author of this article) says: “Making sure this first tournament was a success was very important not only to me, but to the participants involved as well as some non-participants who provided critical support. My goal was to launch the first of many tournaments (not just for us but to see similar initiatives across the continent) that met the same organizational standards as tournaments in Europe (3 month advance notice, open to all, 16+ participants). While that goal was almost accomplished, historically speaking, Denmark also had 12-person tournaments for a while in 2008. I can therefore say I am totally satisfied by the event’s success, its result, as well as its eventual future.”

Speaking of the future, the next North American Riichi Open in Montreal can be planned for in advance: the date is 90% certain to be June 4-5, 2016 (the 10% uncertainty is due to scheduling away from the F1 Grand Prix weekend).

We hope to see more of you here next year, you might be able to stand on the podium too, the replica podium in front of Montreal’s Olympic Stadium as seen below!

20150614_175629[1]__podium

To contact the organizing team for information and planning for the next event in 2016, please contact us using this year’s tournament e-mail, at: tournoi2015 ## riichi # ca (substitute usual symbols in the address). We plan on informing people well in advance with the explicit goal of obtaining registrations as soon as possible for next year, with an early bird special prior to February 29, 2016.

Rank Name Score (thousands)
1 Claudel B. 112.3
2 Sean H. 71.1
3.5 Marc-André D. 63.2
3.5 Luke M. 63.2
5 Senechal D. 56.5
6 Shan K. 37.8
7 Kyuu 28.7
8 Alex B. -21.7
9 Anne R. -30.4
10 Dasuke -38.9
11 Anne-Marie D. -167.7
12 Patrick M. -187.1

 


  • Article precision: the term “Open” (in English) or “omnium” (in French) implies not only the passive idea of letting anyone participate (no mattter their gender, age, race, nationality, or favourite ice cream flavour), but by inviting people openly to do so. There have been micro-tournies, league-type “tournies”, and closed-club tournaments, as well as spontaneous things before: while acknowledging their existence, I believe the usage of “1st Open” on the continent was and is totally justified, w.r.t. Japanese mahjong. Here’s to hoping that the “2nd NARO” (even if it doesn’t use that name to advertise) will take place somewhere else prior to Montreal in June 2016.

NA/EU Super Weekend: June 13/14 – Mahjong Study Session in Paris by Moriyama + First North American Riichi Open Reminder

Great news on both continents!

(Shameless plug)
In North America, the first North American Riichi Open is taking place in Montreal, Qc. (Canada). Registrations are still ongoing, contact tournoi2015@riichi.ca for more information :)
(/Shameless plug)

In Europe, the professional player and president of the Japan Professional Mahjong League, Mr. Shigekazu MORIYAMA, is organizing two clinics in Paris the same weekend. From the French Fed’s forum:

The French Federation of Mahjong has the pleasure to notify you that the Tri Nitro Tiles and Magic Mahjong Social Pung clubs are co-organizing an event promoted as the first of its kind in France: a strategy course with a professional mahjong player as instructor!
This event, which will be held 2 weeks before the French Riichi Championship, is a great way to put all chances on your side to succeed at that competition!

The pro: Mr. Moriyama is nothing less than one of the founders and the actual president of the JPML, he is also one of the members of the World Riichi Championship Committee.

If you want to know more on this iconic player, you can read his interview on reachmahjong.com: Part 1. Part 2.

Riichi Study Session (it isn’t mandatory to be present both days):

June 13, 2015 from 16:00 to 20:00, at the MMSP location: 33 rue Blanche, 75009 Paris
June 14, 2015 from 11:00 to 17:00, at the TNT location: 45-47 rue des pavillons, 92800 Puteaux

This course will be translated in English as it is open to all players of the EMA, who is supporting this project.
Entrance is free (no cost) for all registered players of the EMA.

For more information, please contact the MMSP and TNT presidents directly.

From Gemma, Representative of the JPML
From Oliv’, Chief of competitive activities of the FFMJ.

So no excuses people, time to get off your butts and go somewhere French-speaking for the weekend :)

[Montreal (QC), Canada] 1st North American Riichi Open

Welcome to all,

I am proud to present to you the 1st North American Riichi Open that will be held in Montreal!

Date: June 13 and 14, 2015.
Time: 0900 to 1730, Saturday and Sunday.
Location: Collège de Maisonneuve, room E-3313.
Address: 3800, Sherbrooke Street East, Montréal (Québec) H1X 2A2
Format: 8 hanchan of 90 minutes.
Rules: Japanese Mahjong, competitive ari-ari style. More details below.
Registration: By e-mail, at tournoi2015@riichi.ca and responding to the provided registration form.
Cost: $40 (about 32 USD), paid in advance at the club or by Paypal.

==========
DETAILS

The tournament will consist of an 8-game competition (hanchan, 4 on Saturday and 4 on Sunday) and registration is open to all. It will be held at the “Collège Maisonneuve” (3800, rue Sherbrooke Est (métro station Pie-IX)) and the registration cost is 40 $, with two lunches included.

The number of registrations is limited to 32 for the moment. We wish to welcome all participants from Montreal, from Canada, from the United States and beyond.

INFORMATION
To contact the organization: tournoi2015@riichi.ca
Accepted payments: Either in cash during a club meet or by Paypal in advance. Please contact us before paying. Registration is open until May 18.
Location: 3800, Sherbrooke Street East, Montréal, QC — Entrance on de Bourbonnière — Métro station Pie-IX

Interview with Simon from Chuuren Potos Jansou (Marseille [FR])

Last November, Simon proceeded to open a business: a jansou in Marseille, France. We had a chance to interview him back in November, and are releasing the content of the interview on osamuko.com. Our interview was conducted live on IRC in front of a digital audience: this implies that separate lines have been separated by three dashes (rendered as an em dash) and that some responses may be slightly out of chronological order by a few seconds. Irrelevant comments were removed, but relevant interjections from the IRC channel were welcome and present below.

Introduction

♦Senechal: Anyways, to not make things difficult, I’ll probably just go through the question list I sent before and whatever comes up spontaneously we’ll find a way to work it in
♠Simon: Fine with me — I didn’t prepare any answers though so I may lag a bit..
♦Senechal: no problem — First of all, before we hit the questions part, tell us about Chuuren Potos, the first public jansou in Europe and only active one outside Asia.

♠Simon: I think we will all agree to say that mahjong, especially riichi, is just starting out outside of Japan. — In Europe it is mostly represented by organizations which aim at federating clubs. — Clubs in themselves are available in most major cities, so if you are a player you should be able to find some place where you can hit the table. — But what is mahjong remains a bit blurry. — What we wanted to do was to show people arround us what it is IRL. — and that’s what we try to focus on. — So this jansou is supposed to be not only a place to play but also to discover “the wonderful world of mahjong” if I may use this overused figure. (more…)

Winter 2015 Online Mahjong Initiatives

Quick reminders of what is going on, since the completion of the Bugmoney tournament.

  • Light Mahjong Club: Info via reddit and IRC, Saturday January 24, 18:00 UTC and ongoing.
  • 2015 WAML Season 1: Info via website, wiki and IRC. Registration now open on the website, closing March 15, 23:59 UTC. Opponents will be assigned: times can be anything agreeable and played anytime until the deadlines.

Now since I will be running the WAML league activities, I would like to mention that this is totally unlike the 2012-2013 freeplay league that was running. This will resemble more the kind of performance and competitiveness that JPML and NPM Kyoukai leagues have, where everyone has an equal amount of games to play, promotions into higher leagues or demotions will occur and the awarding of osamuko.com-recognized dan rankings will occur through the accumulation of power points over the seasons.

If you are still relatively new to mahjong, we recommend that you both practice in lighter events like LMC and play Tenhou to acquire a ranked account. WAML has a soft cap of 1-dan for players seeking to join: players below this cap are subject to passing a pro-test. We are aiming to recruit players from around the world.

One warning is to be made: matches are your responsibility to set up. Refusal to use IRC or inability to play except during a single three hour block once every two weeks will result in potential action taken by the management. Players should be able to be present in the channel at the deadline should the group matches not be played by then in order to solve the problem.

We will keep recruiting up to March 15, but if we start getting 17+ players, we will form some groups for immediate playing into WAML Season 1. Stay tuned!

WRC seeding for the preliminary round… (tables and stuff)

For those interested in who will be paying who, the staff at osamuko.com would like to both explain how and who will play who, given the drawing mechanism and who got what number.

Essentially, players were divided into 4 groups. Players may not play against other players from the same country, with the obvious exception of Japan (and France to help smooth organization). Players will play each other on locked cycles, where… (more…)