Yaku overview pdf

Crossposted to 0x23mahjong, because I’m awesome that way.

A simple yaku overview sheet (2 pages), based on tenhou’s yaku table. No scoring tables, no rules. Image quality sucks, because I’m too lazy to do better (sue me). Spot any mistakes just tell me and I’ll fix it for the next version. Here it is.

27 thoughts on “Yaku overview pdf

  1. Hahah, I remember back when I tried to PDF a Spanish yaku chart I made, the hands I generated were consisted of random sets I just made up on spot, and later on I noticed the chin itsu I had made was also a chuu ren accidentally. So, yeah, assembling yaku charts and all is not that simple when you have to include all special circumstances that turn one yaku into another, and the like (toi toi, vs suu an kou, vs san an kou, why pinfu is pinfu, etc). So, the PDF is very appreciated, drob! Thanks.

  2. @zero

    Shou san gen, 2 han. Plus 1 han of one of the yakuhai, plus the 1 han of the other yakuhai. It’s the same thing if you want to say Shou San Gen is 4 han without counting the yakuhai, or 2 han counting the yakuhai.

  3. Thanks for the explanation. I’m still a beginner, and I was a little confused because I saw “4 han” on other sites.
    But yeah, now I understand.

  4. You’re welcome.

    Do note that the same thing may occur in some sites with Hon Rou Tou. 4 fan as a whole (counting toitoi/chitoi), or 2 fan without counting toitoi/chitoi.

  5. About chuuren, I’ve been wondering… if you have ankan’d the 1 or 9, it doesn’t count as chuuren anymore, right? Or does it? Looking at it from one side, you have ruined the shape of the chuuren, but on the other, it’s still closed and may be counted as chuuren if we consider the ankan as a koutsu (like when you have an ankan in your suu an kou). So… I’m not quite sure.

  6. Excellent chart, I didn’t know you could get suu an kou by ron if it was on a pair, speaking of which, wouldn’t you get 2 yakuman for that? Or does tenhou not use that rule? Also, what about Renhou (going out on a discard before your first actual turn) and maybe you could explain Nagashi Mangan if there’s room. And one more, isn’t seven sequential pairs worth a yakuman or not? Some games I’ve played allow from the beginning but others, its an optional rule; I just wanted to know what the “official” stance on this hand is. For your entry for “chuuren pooto” does not specify that it is worth a yakuman; I just pointed that out because every other hand did. Nitpicking aside, I like the chart and I love this blog as well.

  7. Q: Excellent chart, I didn’t know you could get suu an kou by ron if it was on a pair, speaking of which, wouldn’t you get 2 yakuman for that? Or does tenhou not use that rule?
    A: Tenhou allows what is weirdly described as “multiple single yakuman”. You have to score two distinct yakuman to score double yakuman. 4-ankou tanki, 4 big winds, tsu-ii-sou is 3Y on Tenhou, but most live games would effectively count 5Y. (2+2+1)

    Q: Also, what about Renhou (going out on a discard before your first actual turn)
    Renhou is almost never regarded as yakuman anymore. Some places straight up ban it, others give it 4 or 5 han. Not allowed on Tenhou.

    Q: and maybe you could explain Nagashi Mangan if there’s room.
    A: All discards have to be terminal or honor tiles. The game must end in a draw, and you may not have called or have been called for any tiles. Done before checking hands for tenpai.

    Q: And one more, isn’t seven sequential pairs worth a yakuman or not? Some games I’ve played allow from the beginning but others, its an optional rule; I just wanted to know what the “official” stance on this hand is
    A: Daisharin (22334455667788) just by regular yaku is worth sanbaiman. Not having it as a yakuman is no big loss. The other false big wheels are worth a bit less. Not counted as yakuman on tenhou, but two dora will do the trick (or one and tsumo).

    Q. For your entry for “chuuren pooto” does not specify that it is worth a yakuman; I just pointed that out because every other hand did. Nitpicking aside, I like the chart and I love this blog as well.

    A: I’m sure drob will fix that someday, maybe. But yeah, until an alternative comes up, this is the best mahjong site in English on the internet.

  8. Well, with Senjo’s answer I might as well remove mine since mine’s less eloquent.

    Also, Nagashi Mangan isn’t a yaku, so whether it should go on the sheet or not I’m not entirely sure of. I’m thinking no.

    Sheet-wise: Fixed Chuuren Pooto, mentioned that the pinfu example features an open wait. Updated.

    @xKime:
    Chuuren Pooto can’t contain any kan, closed or otherwise.

  9. San Shoku Dou Kou is not the same as San Shoku Dou Jun.

    San Shoku Dou Kou is 2 han, yaku. San Shoku Dou Jun is 2 han closed, 1 han open, kuisagari. No exceptions.

  10. What are you saying thanks for, TACOS? It’s my sheet :<

    Fixed, uploaded. TACOS already said thanks, so I don't have to.


    thanks.

  11. Thanks for all the great info on the site, including the wonderful yaku overview. Some friends and I (all beginners) have been playing casual games lately, and after reading over http://www.ofb.net/~whuang/ugcs/gp/mahjong/mahjong.html I was wondering if I understood the scoring rules for the open vs. closed hands correctly. Based on the strongly closed vs. weakly closed info from that site, I think this is right; could someone correct me if any of it’s wrong, or tell me if it’s right? (Numbers are han values, obviously).

    Pinfu – Optional rule “Tsumo Pinfu” (Pinfu only on Tsumo). If not in effect, Ron Pinfu DOES count the 10 fu for menzen ron (while a tsumo pinfu’s 2 fu for menzen tsumo are ignored)

    Iipeikou – Menzen tsumo only

    San An Kou & Suu An Kou – The KOUTSU must be concealed, not the hand. Thus, can only ron if the called tile is not part of the san an kou/suu an kou. Also, the fourth set for san an kou can be open. Suu an kou is double yakuman if waiting for pair.

    Sanshoku Doujun – 2 if menzen tsumo, 1 otherwise

    Ittsuu – 2 if menzen tsumo, 1 otherwise

    Chanta – 2 if menzen tsumo, 1 otherwise

    Chiitoitsu – Menzen tsumo only

    Honitsu – 3 if menzen tsumo, 2 otherwise

    Junchan – 3 if menzen tsumo, 2 otherwise

    Ryanpeikou – Menzen tsumo only

    Chinitsu – 6 if menzen tsumo, 5 otherwise

    Chuuren Pooto – Menzen tsumo only (optional rule allows for menzen ron). Double yakuman on 9-sided wait.

    Kokushi Musou – Can ron regardless of wait. Double yakuman if 13-sided wait.

  12. @Laethiel

    You seem to be mixing up the terms “menzen hand” and “menzen tsumo.”

    I’m not going to go individually about every yaku you posted, however wherever you say “menzen tsumo” you actually mean a “concealed hand.”

    A concealed hand (menzen) is a hand without any called tiles (naki). If you win a concealed hand by tsumo, your hand is fully/strongly concealed, meaning all melds (mentsu) in your hand are in fact concealed (ankan, ankou, anjun). If you win by ron, your hand is weakly concealed, meaning that all mentsu in your hand are concealed, except for the one completed by your win on discard (111m,333p,4448899s ron on 9: 111m, 333p and 444p are concealed. However, 999 is not, and for scoring purpouses it’s counted as an “open set/pon” (minkou). So you wouldn’t get suu an kou, but simply san an kou + toi toi for a total of 4 han points; your hand, however, is considered concealed).

    Menzen tsumo (menzenchin tsumo hou) is a yaku that grants you 1 additional han, and it consists on drawing your own winning tile in a concealed hand.

    Now, some yaku have a property called “kuisagari” which basically means “eat and decrease.” Meaning that if they are formed by eating/calling discards, their base value is decreased by 1 han.
    So, for example, Jun Chan Tai Yao (junchan), grants you always 3 han if it’s concealed (tsumo or ron, doesn’t matter), and 2 han if it’s completed by eating discards.

    So, Jun Chan Tai Yao (junchan)’s base value is 3 han if menzen/concealed hand, regardless of ron hou or tsumo hou. It’s value is only decreased to 2 han if you completed it by having previously called a tile to form a mentsu.

    123789m, 79p, 12399s (hand), ron on 8p: 3 han
    123s(chi) – 123789m, 79p, 99s (hand), tsumo on 8p: 2 han.
    123789m, 79p, 12399s (hand), tsumo on 8p: 4 han (jun chan + menzen tsumo)
    123s(chi) – 123789m, 79p, 99s (hand), ron on 8p: 2 han.

    Some other yaku, are “menzen,” meaning they can only be completed on a closed hand. Some because of their structure, and some just because they were decided that way.
    Chii toi tsu and kokushi musou must be concealed, because there is no way you can get those hands open. But you can still win on ron or tsumo regardless. Same thing happens with Suu An Kou, because if you have at least one of your mentsu open, there’s no way you can comply with the specification for that yaku (four concealed sets).
    ii pei kou, ryan peikou and chuuren (to mention just a few ones you posted), were just decided to be menzen (I think there is actually a pretty good reason for this), and as long as you keep your hand concealed, it doesn’t matter if you win on ron or tsumo, as long as your hand is menzen/concealed.

    Some other yaku, are just “Yaku” and it doesn’t matter whether -the hand- is open or closed as long as the specifications of that yaku are complied (toi toi (all sets), san an kou (three concealed sets), shou san gen, etc).

    At least, in the common ruleset, which is what I assume you will be wanting to use.

    If you need further clarification, check here: http://www.sloperama.com/majexchange/bulletinbd-archive2.htm and scroll (or ctrl+f) all the way to the question by Marissa Vincenti. But I really hope this is clear enough.

  13. Thanks so much for your help, xKime. This was easily the best explanation I’ve seen of concealed hands and kuisagari.

  14. You’re very welcome. There are a good set of explanations on sloperama, Mahjong Wiki, and also oddly enough in Wikipedia.

    Have fun playing, and hope we share a mahjong table one day. Regards.

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